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The word regret leaves a bad taste in my mouth. I don't like it because it doesn't feel right. And I think maybe it doesn't feel right because it's not. It's this weird cloud that looms over me, crackling and booming menacingly. I always thought I subscribed to the idea that we should live without regret. Because it doesn't do anything for us. Regret implies that something can't be changed, and if it's that set in stone, if it's happened and there's nothing we can do about it, what's the point in regretting it happened? I think my biggest problem with regret is that it seems to follow me around. I wouldn't say like a lost puppy because that implies that puppies are as sad as regret and they're not. I would compare it more to an annoying flying insect you can't seem to dodge and it keeps whacking you in the face. But when I think about my regrets, and



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there are many, I try to think of a lesson I might have learned as a result, or something good that might have come from a wrong decision. It's really hard sometimes, and sometimes it takes me years to see the silver lining. But I'm usually able to find it. The thing is, I don't want to have to keep looking for the silver lining in regret. I don't want to move forward in my life and continue to regret things. I don't know quite how I'm going to manage it, but I want to be more mindful of my choices and make sure I think about things before I do anything with a potentially regretful impact. I especially don't want to make a decision that is going to affect someone else without thinking about it and weighing out the pros and cons. And going forward, I want to try to alleviate the feeling of regret without knowing exactly where it's coming from.